The housing crisis in England

What could be achieved if affordable homes were available in every village in the country? Not just by building but requiring the owners of some of the country’s 350,000 second homes to either live in their properties or sell them to people who need them. Second homes and holiday lets need to be capped by local authorities. Politicians need the guts to tackle the existence of thousands of empty investment properties. Villages could become living places again instead of fantasies of the Mercedes owning classes who don’t want their cars getting dirty.

The Government created Regional assemblies for 8 areas of England. These are unaccountable to the people they govern. They cost the tax payers £360 million every year. The people can’t appoint them or sack the unelected members and their support staff. Most of the nice homes with sea views in Cornwall are not owned by local Cornish people, the locals lucky enough to have homes live in shabby estates far away from the holiday cottages. In some of our cities the people no longer own the streets; they have been sold off to private companies like the Paradise project in Liverpool. These companies have their own security people and the shops they provide are for the wealthy economic groups. They are not interested in shops that the poor would like to use like second hand bookshops and shops that sell produce very cheaply. These shops all disappear because they can’t afford the rents charged by the private companies. This happened in Queens Market London, China Town London – it is a form of ethnic cleansing creating spaces for the rich only. Even areas on the canal have been built on by British Waterways providing yuppie flats and Costa coffee shops, and the poor undesirable boaters have had to move on.

We must remeber than in the UK there are more houses than households, many in the north are just boarded up becasue peopel have moved away. We need to get jobs back in these areas. There is also a growth in people living as single people, some down to divorce in later life but many live apart from partners as it is a way to maximise welfare. Many so called single mums, live alone and get theri rents paid, yet the fathers of the children often visit and stop the night. They do this to maximise the welfare they can get. By claiming to be single the welfare system pays all their rent and council tax. If they lived together especially if the partner is working they would be hit by the welfare system and have to pay most of the rent. So the system then needs to provide twice – for two properties.

 

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